Telling_Our_Stories_in_the_Digital_Age.jpg[1]

Presented by:

Cherice Montgomery, Ph.D., Brigham Young University

Friday, December 9, 2011 from 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. at NJPSA, Monroe Township, New Jersey
FLENJ Professional Development Series


Description:


Storytelling can be a powerful approach for fostering communication, collaboration, and creative self-expression that develops students’ proficiency across the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes. In this workshop, participants will enjoy student-created stories from a variety of cultures, genres, languages, and levels and examine ways to integrate stories into existing lessons as tools for fostering meaningful cultural explorations, personal transformation, and social action. We will experiment with various “no tech” alternatives for storytelling (such as circle stories, clone stories, flipbooks, foldables, playdough panels, pop-up books, and smoosh books) and tech-infused options (including Audacity, cell phones, pocket video cameras, and web 2.0 tools such as GoAnimate, GoogleDocs, Mixbook, OurStory, Scrapblog, Storybird, Vokis, & Xtranormal). Participants are encouraged to bring their textbooks, a list of the concepts they want to teach in the next few weeks, and laptops.

Objectives:


  • Participants will explore student-created stories

  • Participants will integrate stories into existing lessons as tools for fostering meaningful communication, cultural explorations, and personal transformation

  • Participants will experiment with low-tech and technology-infused tools for storytelling
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Essential Question:


How can teachers use storytelling to transform traditional grammar and vocabulary lessons into engaging learning experiences that build students’ communicative proficiency?



References:


  1. ^ Fabbri, Gabriella. (2008, March 5). Computer. Stock.xchng. Retrieved March 19, 2008, from http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=view&id=962980 Used under a royalty free, Stock.xchng 8.2 Image License Agreement.